Book Review: Smart Women

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“When you’re without problems,” Claire said, “you’re dead.”

Smart Women, by Judy Blume

Summer is drawing to a close here in Vancouver, and what with working five days a week and attempting to cram every summer activity into precious weekends (namely hiking), I haven’t prioritized reading as much as I should. I recently picked up this book at the library – intrigued because while I’d heard a lot about Judy Blume growing up, I’d never actually read any of her work. I thought this would be a nice introduction to her as an adult, since I’ve found that attempting to read children’s novels as an adult can be a trying experience. The things I like about reading fiction – masterful, detailed prose and the carefully illustrated subtleties of life and relationships – are often lacking in fiction intended for younger, less experienced readers.

Smart Women draws the story of two divorced mothers, Margo and B.B., who live in Boulder, Colorado. B.B.’s ex-husband, Andrew, ends up moving to Boulder, which is the inciting incident of the novel’s plot. There are a variety of characters, including Margo and B.B.’s children, their romantic partners, extended family members, and other Boulder residents, with various subplots.

Although the subject of the novel is obviously intended for adults, I found this book disappointing, especially for my first foray into Blume’s bibliography. Now, I didn’t have the loftiest expectations for this book. I knew I was getting into chick lit, but I’ve read and enjoyed chick lit before, specifically Sophie Kinsella, who despite the genre’s somewhat shallower subject matter, always infuses humor, subtlety, and even gravitas into her books.

Smart Women instead read like a children’s novel, despite the adult subject matter. I found the characters to be shallow husks and stereotypes – Margo and B.B. as two stereotypical divorcees, Michelle as a rebellious teenager, and so on. If the characters weren’t stereotypes, they were simply devoid of any personality. Andrew, B.B.’s ex-husband who ends up dating Margo, is a major character, yet I couldn’t describe a single aspect of his personality. Blume also attempts some character development, especially for the younger characters such as Michelle, Margo’s daughter, but it is half-hearted and clunky, coming seemingly out of nowhere. I felt no sympathy for the characters.

The whole novel, which attempts to focus on something very real – two families attempting to merge together in times of crises – fell flat to me. It failed to capture the nuance of family dynamics or even the reality of being a woman in a believable way. There were several plot points that simply seemed thrown in that had no impact, either on me as a reader or on the story as a whole.

YES OR NO?: NO. I didn’t have high expectations for this novel. I simply wanted something light-hearted and quick that I could enjoy over a few days. Instead, I slogged through this novel, constantly forgetting the names of characters and their relationships to each other due to the lack of characterization. I haven’t read Blume’s other work, but I would pass on this one.

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